The New Horizon

A new world explored with a rational view

The Business of ‘Fake’ Encounters

with 16 comments

The news of Fake Encounters really shaked my heart. From today onwards, I won’t be at the same mood seeing ‘routine’ killing of militants in Kashmir. As it was in the case of ‘Abu Hafiz’, the LeT Commander. Army sources told us that he was killed an ‘encounter’ with SOG (Special Operations Group) on 8th December. And the person who actually killed him, got an award of 120,000Rs (almost US$ 2700).

Almost after one and half months, another prize was offered by an old man, Ghulam Rasool Padroo at Rambagh Police Station near Srinagar. He offered 20,000 Rs to the ASP to find out his missing son Abdul Rehman Padroo, a father of 5 children, a carpenter in profession. The connection between the mentioned incidents is known to us. A DNA examination will be carried out to confirm the the killing of Abdul in a chilling ‘fake encounter’.

The key to this was Constable Farooq Rehman Padroo, a relative of Abdul. Abdul used to work at Rural Development department as a daily wage worker. He paid bribe of Rs. 75,000 to Farooq to ensure a permanent job in that operation. But neither the job was ensured, nor the money came back. 8th December, 2006, he called him to the Police Station. Abdul never returned back. It is alleged that Farooq, with his four associates in the Police Station, killed Abdul and distributed the money among themselves.

Sources : Anandabazar Patrika and Hindustan Times(along with two more cases of Nazir Ahmad Deka and Shoukat Ahmad Khan).

The latest update : The SSP Hansraj Parihar and his deputy Bahadur Ram are been arrested in the connection. The tension continues in Kashmir. TOI reports that even ShivSena is protesting these fake encounters.

How can we survive the corruption by lawkeepers? Or perhaps we can if we have some money to engage a few people, a few renouned lawyers, a few NGOs and media. But, what’s really a price of a carperner in a terror-prone Kashmir? What can his family do to save his life? Nothing … practically.

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Written by Diganta

February 5, 2007 at 9:06 am

16 Responses

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  1. What you have written is true, but one side of the story. The other side of the story is equally chilling too..Atrocities in a war are assumed. What one does not understand is the civilian murders and the use of powerless civilians by both sides as pawns.

    How do we know

    February 6, 2007 at 7:35 am

  2. Of course they are highlighted once they happens.

    Diganta

    February 6, 2007 at 7:37 am

  3. Truth is stranger than fiction. I read on Kashmir a little, and what I found out was horrible. It is a very interesting place. Nobody knows what’s really happening. I even heard allegations that security plants bombs to blame the militants!

    When I came to knwo about all these, I was shattered! As citizen, we really arn’t doing enough. We are just assuming that our goverment in responsible enough. I think we should try to find out.

    If necessary, we should put pressure on the govt, by writing, because that is the most civilised thing we can do, to behave itself.

    Otherwise we may fail in our duties.

    References:
    See this

    Counter Currents Archive of articles on Kahmir.

    You will also find this interesting. Unrelated to the topic, though.

    Manas Shaikhhttp://wishsubmission.wordpress.com

    February 7, 2007 at 3:32 pm

  4. Truth is stranger than fiction. I read on Kashmir a little, and what I found out was horrible. It is a very interesting place. Nobody knows what’s really happening. I even heard allegations that security plants bombs to blame the militants!

    When I came to knwo about all these, I was shattered! As citizen, we really arn’t doing enough. We are just assuming that our goverment in responsible enough. I think we should try to find out.

    If necessary, we should put pressure on the govt, by writing, because that is the most civilised thing we can do, to behave itself.

    Otherwise we may fail in our duties.

    References:
    See this

    Counter Currents Archive of articles on Kahmir.

    You will also find this interesting. Unrelated to the topic, though.

    Manas Shaikh

    February 7, 2007 at 3:32 pm

  5. Yeah, really nobody knows what’s happening in Kashmir because there are as many terrorists as armymen. So, there are both cases of fake encounters, custodial deaths and also terrorists killing innocents and posing as Armymen.

    I refrain from passing any judgement on anything on Kashmir before they are really crystal clear to me. That’s why one can find almost no blogs dedicated to that problem.

    Diganta

    February 8, 2007 at 5:41 am

  6. I don’t think there are as many terrorists as armymen. I read somewhere that civilian to army ratio in Kashmir is 10:1. If a family consists of around six people, Around one in two families will have one grown up man to spare. Of them, even if one in five join the terrorists (which I think is too high a ratio to be true), even then we have the terrorists outnumbered by 1:6.

    “I refrain from passing any judgement on anything on Kashmir before they are really crystal clear to me”

    -yeah I know that the hard way! the way you grill me on my blog…

    Manashttp://wishsubmission.wordpress.com

    February 8, 2007 at 6:30 am

  7. I don’t think there are as many terrorists as armymen. I read somewhere that civilian to army ratio in Kashmir is 10:1. If a family consists of around six people, Around one in two families will have one grown up man to spare. Of them, even if one in five join the terrorists (which I think is too high a ratio to be true), even then we have the terrorists outnumbered by 1:6.

    “I refrain from passing any judgement on anything on Kashmir before they are really crystal clear to me”

    -yeah I know that the hard way! the way you grill me on my blog…

    Manas

    February 8, 2007 at 6:30 am

  8. The terrorists in valley are by large outnumbered by Armymen (1:6 or 1:10) but if you consider infiltrating terrorists or terrorists getting trained outside India, the number comes closer to 1:1.
    (I don’t really consider ‘terrorists’ in the valley as terrorists until they kill civilians and civilians are mostly killed by infiltrating terrorists).

    I grill you to get a clear understanding of your thought [:)]. I hope you don’t mind.

    Diganta

    February 8, 2007 at 6:36 am

  9. Diganta, to have same number of infiltrators as the army present there is impractical.

    If the local recruit are outnumbered in 1 to 6, then 5 in 6 recruits has to come from across the border. Which is basically saaying almost all of them has to cross the border.

    That is impossible. So much movement across the border is not possible. Army has a big advantage. They can move in and out easily on highways.

    Second, even if so many get in, somehow, you need to run a big infrastructure to maintain them. Who will run that, and how? Without attracting attention?

    Third you will need a huge amount of money to supply arms and logistics. To supply such an unorganised (scattered, because they can’t make a camp like army does) establishment.

    Organising and mobilising them, without such infrastructure as the one army has is very difficult.

    I don’t mind your questioning. Often I learn from them.

    Manas Shaikhhttp://wishsubmission.wordpress.com

    February 8, 2007 at 2:30 pm

  10. Diganta, to have same number of infiltrators as the army present there is impractical.

    If the local recruit are outnumbered in 1 to 6, then 5 in 6 recruits has to come from across the border. Which is basically saaying almost all of them has to cross the border.

    That is impossible. So much movement across the border is not possible. Army has a big advantage. They can move in and out easily on highways.

    Second, even if so many get in, somehow, you need to run a big infrastructure to maintain them. Who will run that, and how? Without attracting attention?

    Third you will need a huge amount of money to supply arms and logistics. To supply such an unorganised (scattered, because they can’t make a camp like army does) establishment.

    Organising and mobilising them, without such infrastructure as the one army has is very difficult.

    I don’t mind your questioning. Often I learn from them.

    Manas Shaikh

    February 8, 2007 at 2:30 pm

  11. So many does not get in because of the presence of the Army. That was my point. If you open the boundary, those many will come into India to ‘free’ Indian Kashmir.

    Indian Kashmir has a lenght of international border measuring more than 2300km (more than double than the next).
    http://sunsite.serc.iisc.ernet.in/India/neighbor.htm

    Moreover, Pakistan or UN never recognized Indian Kashmir as a part of India. So, a attack on Indian Kashmir is not bound by treaties (except Simla Treaty, which UN is only a bilateral one). India has to continue the strength at LOC until a permanent deal, sponsored by International community is struck.

    Diganta

    February 9, 2007 at 3:18 am

  12. The next is the Army inside the city. Well, that’s really bad and Indian Army should be slowly withdrawn from the center of cities and replace them with local Police and Para-Military forces. The reason they were deployed at the first place was the attack on minorities in Kashmir and the attack on all Govt representatives and companies. The same way it were deployed in Gujarat at the time of problems. Of course I am not justifying the all the actions of the Army in Kashmir, but just trying to convey the Indian official point of view.

    Diganta

    February 9, 2007 at 6:51 am

  13. My verdict to the Kashmir problem would be –
    1) Declare autonomy in valley, separate state for Ladakh and Jammu.
    2) The autonomy would take them back to pre-1951 stage, when they used to retain all authorities except for Foreign Affairs and Defence.
    3) Withdraw Army from the streets, strengthed Police forces in the valley, but put more surrveilance at the border. Remember that high presence of Army was a feature in Kashmir since 1965 but they were in the borders.

    I think India is heading towards this and I hope I would see a haapy Indian Kashmir within next 10 years.

    Diganta

    February 9, 2007 at 6:56 am

  14. Fake encounters really sadden me. Innocent people are at the recieving end ,whether it is fake encounters or terrorism. Thank God we have started accepting the truth about fake encounters now(thank free media),deaths due to terrorist attacks were always known. Instead of thinking as Pakistanis or Indians let us think as humans, the solutions will be found only then.Every problem has a solution, we have open our hearts.

    pr3rna

    February 21, 2007 at 12:20 pm

  15. […] Speaks writes about the recent fake encounter The news of Fake Encounters really shaked my heart. From today […]

  16. Interesting comments.. 😀

    imparare

    April 15, 2007 at 5:57 am


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